Thursday, February 26, 2015

Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for Teens


Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for Teens

When I decided to adapt my 2013 book Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for a teen audience, I was excited about adding ideas and illustrations that teens would relate to. And it was a fun and insightful process. In the book, which releases this week, you can find stories about people like championship surfer Bethany Hamilton, tech guru Steve Jobs, and Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousavzai. I believe each of them can teach teens – and adults – something important about turning a loss into a win.
Today’s excerpt features someone else that many of us can relate to, and how he journeyed from mistakes to success.

Responsibility: The First Step of Learning

Robert Downey Jr. knows a thing or two about mistakes. Today, the star of Iron Man, The Avengers, and Sherlock Holmes is riding a wave of success. He’s rich, he’s famous, and the movies he’s starred in have earned billions at the box office. But just over a decade ago he was on a much different journey.
In the 1980s and ’90s, Downey showed so much promise that he was described as “the best actor of his generation.” But behind the scenes, his life was a mess. From the time he was around nine years old, Robert Downey Jr. was a drug addict. And even as he succeeded onscreen, his real-world life was in chaos.
Starting in 1996, Downey’s addiction started getting him in trouble with the law. For most of us, being arrested once would get our attention. But even after multiple arrests, multiple trips to rehab, multiple court appearances, and twelve months in prison, Downey stayed on the same destructive path. It looked as if he was going to squander his talent.
Finally, around 2002, after losing yet another major acting job and becoming uninsurable in the film world, he made a decision. He took responsibility for himself. “I just happened to be in a situation the very last time and I said, ‘You know what? I don’t think I can continue doing this,’ ” he told Oprah Winfrey in an interview in 2004. “And I reached out for help and I ran with it, you know?”
Today Robert Downey Jr. lives a much different life. He takes responsibility for his actions every day. He stays busy with work. And he practices wing chun, a martial art that he credits with developing discipline in every area of his life. He has also surrounded himself with people who will help him and hold him accountable. When asked about his past, he doesn’t deny or minimize it. “To me, here’s the only thing: You take responsibility, whether you’re outraged by the results or not, that you in some way participate in and create what you’re experiencing,” he’s said. “I don’t pretend it didn’t happen.”
We tend to think of responsibility as something given to us by someone who is in a position of authority, such as a parent or a teacher. And that is often the case. But responsibility is also something we must be willing to take. And after more than forty years leading and mentoring people, I have come to the conclusion that responsibility is the most important ability that a person can possess. Nothing happens to advance our potential until we step up and say, “I am responsible.” If you don’t take responsibility, you give up control of your life.
Every time you fail, you have a choice: to take responsibility and do things that lead to future success, or to avoid the temporary pain of responsibility and make excuses. If we respond right to failure by taking responsibility, we can look at our failure and learn from it. As a result, we won’t be as prone to making the same mistake again. However, if we bail out on our responsibility, if we don’t examine our failures, we don’t learn from them. As a result, we often experience the same failures and losses over and over again.
Article by: John C. Maxwell.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Continue Your Learning Curve By: Jim Rohn


Continue Your Learning Curve By: Jim Rohn  

From birth, up until the time we are about eighteen, our learning curve is dramatic, and our capacity to learn during this period is just staggering. We learn a tremendous amount very fast. We learn language, culture, history, science, mathematics… everything!
For some people, the accelerated learning process will continue on. But for most, it levels off when they get their first job. If there are no more exams to take, if there’s no demand to get out paper and pencil, why read any more books? Of course, you will learn some things through experience. Just getting out there – sometimes doing it wrong and sometimes doing it right – you will learn.
Can you imagine what would happen if you kept up an accelerated learning curve all the rest of your life? Can you imagine what you could learn to do, the skills you could develop, the capacities you could have? Here’s what I’m asking you to do:  be that unusual person who keeps up his learning curve and develops an appetite for always trying to find good ideas.
One way to feed your mind and educate your philosophy is through the writings of influential people. Maybe you can’t meet the person, but you can read his or her books. Churchill is gone, but we still have his books. Aristotle is gone, but we still have his ideas. Search libraries for books and programs. Search magazines. Search documentaries. They are full of opportunities for intellectual feasting.
In addition to reading and listening, you also need a chance to do some talking and sharing. I have some people in my life who help me with important life questions, who assist me in refining my own philosophy, weighing my values and pondering questions about success and lifestyle.
We all need association with people of substance to provide influence concerning major issues such as society, money, enterprise, family, government, love, friendship, culture, taste, opportunity, and community. Philosophy is mostly influenced by ideas, ideas are mostly influenced by education, and education is mostly influenced by the people with whom we associate.
One of the great fortunes of my life was to be around Mr. Shoaff those five years. During that time he shared with me at dinner, during airline flights, at business conferences, in private conversations and in groups. He gave me many ideas that enabled me to make small daily adjustments in my philosophy and activities. Those daily changes, some very slight, but very important, soon added up to weighty sums.
A big part of the lesson was having Mr. Shoaff repeat the ideas over and over. You just can’t hear the fundamentals of life philosophy too often. They are the greatest form of nutrition, the building blocks for a well-developed mind.
I’m asking that you feed your mind just as you do your body. Feed it with good ideas, wherever they can be found. Always be on the lookout for a good idea – a business idea, a product idea, a service idea, an idea for personal improvement. Every new idea will help to refine your philosophy. Your philosophy will guide your life, and your life will unfold with distinction and pleasure.
Article by: Jim Rohn.

Monday, February 23, 2015

Vision is Crucial


Vision is Crucial

If you don’t see yourself as a winner, then you cannot perform as a winner. You cannot perform in a manner inconsistent with the way you see yourself.”
The me you see, is the me you will be!  This is so important, so many people struggle for the simple reason that they are unable to see themselves successful.  If you talk to someone who is significantly overweight, chances are you’ll find that they are unable to see themselves “skinny,” they can’t consistently perceive it.  Now, I’m not picking on individuals who are overweight…  because everyone deals with perception issues!  And that’s not to say that you can’t imagine something “for a second,” what I’m saying is that you don’t really believe it’s possible for you, you can’t consistently see it.
“If you can’t see it, you can’t have it.”
You must see it!  Your life is exactly what you’ve been able to see and believe up until this point.
Article by: Zig Ziglar.

Check out G’s Vision:

G’s Vision Statement:
I Am A Playful and Powerful Warrior! I am committed to being and living as the Playful and Powerful Warrior I am. I live with purpose, on purpose and for purpose! I am a self-starting warrior who exercises initiative in accomplishing my life’s goals. I choose to embrace and use my God given talents and gifts bestowed upon me, to assist others. I choose to lead by example!

G’s Vision

I Am A Playful and Powerful Warrior and I choose to build constant trustworthy win-win relationships with my family, friends, and business associates. I choose to balance my career, family, and friends as best I am able to, since all are important to me. Above all, I will always place God first.
It is important for me to associate myself professionally and individually with others who share my core values and objectives. With the help of ‘like-minded’ associates, together we are all able to achieve our goals, dreams and aspirations.
I choose to positively influence the present and future developments that God has chosen for myself, family, associates and the organizations I am associated with. I choose to lead by example. I choose action to assist others to learn, to grow beyond their current bounds, and for them to be the best they are. I choose to always be a TEAM player and to do whatever is best for the TEAM, while honoring my self.
My money is a tool to accomplish positive results and invoke positive results. I choose financial independence and to live and be debt free. I choose to spend less than I earn and regularly save or invest part of what I have. I give to causes I am passionate for, starting with the MissionG Foundation.
I choose to start with the end in mind and have a personal direction to guide all of my activities. Beginning with the end in mind, I am choosing direction of my own life and providing meaning to the actions I choose every day.
To always remember, I control three things. My Thoughts. My Words and My Actions. I choose to create a life of self-fullness and to live with purpose, on purpose and for purpose!

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Rohn on Lifestyle: How to Make Magic with a Rose and a Milkshake


Rohn on Lifestyle: How to Make Magic with a Rose and a Milkshake

How simple, but thoughtful, acts of generosity can affect your relationships and define your lifestyle
Jim Rohn

What is a good lifestyle, really? It’s style over amount. So what is style? It’s an art, the art of living. You can’t buy style with money, and you can’t buy good taste with money. You can only buy more with money. Lifestyle is culture—the appreciation of good music, dance, art, sculpture, literature, plays and living well. It’s a taste for the fine, the unique, the beautiful. A respectable lifestyle should also involve rewarding excellence wherever you find it by not taking the small things for granted. And with Valentine’s Day fast approaching, I wanted to illustrate this with one of my favorite personal anecdotes:
Many years ago, my friend and I were on a trip to Carmel, Calif., for some shopping and exploring. On the way, we stopped at a service station, and as soon as we parked our car in front of the pumps, a young man, about 18 or 19, came bouncing out to the car and with a big smile asked, “Can I help you?”
“Yes,” I answered. “A full tank of gas, please.” Mind you, this was when gas stations had both full- and self-serve pumps. Still, I wasn’t prepared for what followed. This young man checked every tire, washed every window—even the sunroof—singing and whistling the whole time. We couldn’t believe the quality of service and his upbeat attitude.
When he brought the bill, I said, “Hey, you really have taken good care of us. I appreciate it.”
“I really enjoy working,” he said. “It’s fun for me, and I get to meet nice people like you.” This kid was really something.
“We’re on our way to Carmel, and we want to get some milkshakes,” I told him. “Can you tell us where we can find the nearest Baskin-Robbins?”
“It’s just a few blocks away,” he said, giving us the directions. Then he added, “Don’t park out front—park around to the side so your car won’t get sideswiped.” What a kid!
At the ice cream shop, we ordered milkshake—hers, mine and a third one. We drove back to the station. Our young friend dashed out to greet us. “Hey, I see you got your milkshakes!”
“Yes, and this one is for you.”
His mouth fell open. “For me?”
“Sure. With all the fantastic service you gave us, I couldn’t leave you out of the milkshake deal.”
“Wow!” He was simply astonished.
As we drove off, I could see him in my rearview mirror, just standing there, grinning from ear to ear.
Now, what did this little act of generosity cost me? Only about $2. You see, it’s not the money; it’s the style.
Well, I must have been feeling especially creative that day, because upon our arrival in Carmel, I drove straight to a flower shop. As we walked inside, I said to the florist, “I’d like to buy one long-stemmed rose.”
The florist, a rather unromantic type, replied, “We sell them by the dozen.”
“I don’t need a dozen,” I said, “just one please.”
“Well,” he replied haughtily, “it will cost you $2.”
“Wonderful,” I exclaimed. “There’s nothing worse than a cheap rose.”
Selecting the rose with some deliberation, I handed it to my friend. She was so impressed! And the cost? Just $2. Later that day, she looked up and said, “Jim, I must be the only woman in Carmel today carrying a rose.” And I believe she probably was.
Can you imagine the opportunity to create magic with those around you—and all for the cost of a few dollars, some imagination and attention? Remember, it is not the amount that matters but the thought and care that often has the greatest impact upon those you love.
- See more at: http://www.success.com/article/rohn-how-to-make-magic-with-a-rose-and-a-milkshake#sthash.Lpro7AcK.dpuf

Saturday, February 21, 2015

The Hope for Future Achievement and the Capacity for Faith-by Napoleon Hill


The Hope for Future Achievement and
the Capacity for Faith-
by Napoleon Hill

Hope is the forerunner of the greatest of all states of mind, Faith! Hope sustains one in times of emergency when, without it, fear would take over. Hope is the basis of the most profound form of happiness which comes from the expectancy of success in some, as yet unattained, plan or purpose. Poor indeed is the person who cannot look toward the future with the hope that he will become the person he would like to be, or attain the position he would like to hold in life, or attain the objective he has failed to acquire in the past. Hope keeps the soul of man alert and active in his behalf, and clears the line of communication by which Faith connects one with Infinite Intelligence. Hope is a right royal person and the Divine Decorator of the other eleven riches of life.
Faith is the means of communication between the conscious mind of man and the great universal reservoir of Infinite Intelligence. It is the fertile soil of the garden of the human mind, wherein may be produced all the riches of life. It is the “eternal elixir” which gives creative power and action to the impulses of thought. It is the √©lan vital of the soul and it is without limitations. Faith is the spiritual quality which, when mixed with prayer, gives one direct and immediate connection with Infinite Intelligence. Faith is the power which transmutes the ordinary energies of thought into their spiritual equivalent, and it is the only means by which Infinite Intelligence may be appropriated to the uses of man.
Source:  You Can Work Your Own Miracles. Random House. 1996. Pg. 81.
Article by: Napoleon Hill.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Why Losses Hurt So Much-By: John C. Maxwell

Why Losses Hurt So Much-By: John C. Maxwell

When I adapted Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for Teens (February 24), I wanted to make it conversational in a way that would appeal to a teen or preteen. And I decided to make it more interactive, with sections for journaling and even Q and A with me.
Here is another excerpt from the book. I hope you will share it with a young person in your life, and that it encourages them to view losses differently:
As a kid, I played basketball and was very competitive. I liked to win, and I hated losing. When I was in my early twenties, I went to a class reunion, where I played in a game against other former players from my high school team. We were all eager to prove we could still play at the same level, and it turned out to be a very physical game. Of course, I wanted to win, so I was very aggressive. After I knocked one opponent to the floor, he shouted in frustration, “Back off, it’s only a game!”
My reply: “Then let me win.”
I’m not exactly proud of that, but I think it shows how much most of us like to win. When we win, nothing hurts. But when we lose, everything is hard. And the only time you hear someone use the phrase “It’s only a game” is when that person is losing.
Think of some of the losses in your life and how they made you feel. Not good, right? And it’s not just the pain of the moment that affects us. Our losses also cause us other difficulties. Here are two:

Losses Cause Us to Be Emotionally Stuck

Author and speaker Les Brown says, “The good times we put in our pocket. The hard times we put into our heart.” I have found that to be true in my life. In my heart I still carry some of the bad times. I bet you do, too. The negative experiences affect us more deeply than positive ones, and if you’re like me, you may get emotionally stuck.
It’s been said that if an ocean liner could think and feel, it would never leave its dock. It would be afraid of the thou- sands of huge waves it would have to encounter during its travels. Anxiety and fear can really damage the human heart. So can losses. They can weaken, imprison, paralyze, discourage, and sicken us. To be successful, we need to find ways to get unstuck emotionally.
Journal It!
Have you ever kept a journal? I’ve found that many very successful people do. I believe it’s because writing in a journal can help you think through your reactions to the things that happen to you. By journaling what you think and feel, you’re able to see a situation clearly and figure out what to do next. It allows you to get unstuck emotionally and move forward. I recommend that you keep a journal while reading this book.
For your first journal entry, spend some time writing about your attitude on failure. Many people are really afraid of failure. How much do you fear it? When you do mess up, what feelings get stirred up? Anger? Sadness? Do you feel defeated? How hard is it for you to get unstuck and move forward?
As you continue reading, you’ll find more exercises like this one. I also encourage you to write down in your journal how you feel about what you’re reading. Doing so will help you to track your progress and growth as you go.

Losses Cause Us to Be Mentally Defeated

Life is a series of losses. In childhood you lose your favorite toys. You get older and lose days dedicated to play and exploration. You lose the privilege of being irresponsible and carefree. Later, you’ll separate from the protection of your family as you leave the nest and take on adult responsibilities. Over the course of your adult life, you’ll lose jobs and positions. Your self-esteem may take a beating. You may lose money. You’ll miss opportunities. Friends and family may die or move on. All along, everyone’s life is filled with loss. Some losses are great; some are small. And the losses we face affect how we think. Some people handle losing well, while others don’t.
Too often losing can go to your head. It can defeat you, and you might have trouble coming up with solutions to your challenges. As the losses build up, they become more of a burden. You probably regret the losses of yesterday. And you fear the losses of tomorrow.
But here’s the thing: We want success, but we should train for losses. We need to expect mistakes, failures, and losses in life, since each of us will face many of them. But we need to take them as they come, not allow them to build up. As printer William A. Ward said, “Man, like a bridge, was designed to carry the load of the moment, not the combined weight of a year all at once.”
Q&A with JOHN
Q: What was one of your biggest losses growing up?
A: It was my junior year of high school. I was on the varsity basketball team, and we were expected to do really well. People were saying that we could win the state championship. We just had a lot of talent on the team. But we didn’t win the championship. We didn’t even come close. It was devastating and discouraging for me, but I learned something big from it. Our team had failed because the juniors and seniors didn’t get along. So we didn’t work together. What I learned was the importance of teamwork—even more than talent— in winning. The next year, as a senior, I did my part in making us a unified team. And as a result, we played much better— even though the amount of talent was less.
Article by: John C. Maxwell.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

To Lead Others, First Lead Yourself-By: John C. Maxwell


To Lead Others, First Lead Yourself-By: John C. Maxwell

During a Q&A session at a conference, someone asked, “What has been your greatest challenge as a leader?”
“Leading me!” I answered. “That has always been my greatest challenge as a leader.” Some in the audience were surprised by my response.  The more experienced leaders were not.  Like me, they could trace many of their failures to their own personal leadership mismanagement.  Isn’t that also true for you?  If I could kick the person responsible for my problems, I wouldn’t be able to sit down for a week!

Look in the Mirror

Learning to lead yourself well is one of the most important things you’ll ever do as a leader.  For almost forty years I’ve served others as a leader, and for more than two and a half decades of that time I was the senior pastor of a church.  My years working with people have taught me an important truth: people seldom see themselves realistically. Human nature seems to endow us with the ability to size up everybody in the world except ourselves. That’s why my book Winning with People begins with the Mirror Principle: “The first person we must examine is ourselves.” If you don’t look at yourself realistically, you will never understand where your personal difficulties are coming from.
Most people use two totally different sets of criteria for judging themselves and judging others. We tend to judge others according to their actions. It’s very cut-and-dried. However, we judge ourselves by our intentions. Even if we do the wrong thing, we let ourselves off the hook if we believe our intentions are good. That’s part of the reason we allow ourselves to make the same mistakes over and over again before we are willing to make real changes.
Take Action
How clearly do you see yourself? To get a more objective look at yourself, review your performance from the last year. List all of your major goals and objectives, then mark each as either “achieved” or “not achieved.” Now show the list to someone you know and respect, and tell the person you are evaluating a candidate for a job. Ask them what they think based on the “candidate’s” achievements and failures. How does that person’s evaluation jive with your own? This will tell you a lot about your self-perception.

Keys to Leading Yourself

Why is leading yourself well so important?  Because there is a lot riding on it.  God has given each of us things to do.  I want to complete them during my brief time here on earth, don’t you?  And I don’t want to fail because I wasn’t willing to put in the hard work when no one else was looking.  The Apostle Paul understood this.  In 1 Corinthians 9:25-27, he writes, “Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last; but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like a man running aimlessly; I do not fight like a man beating the air. No, I beat my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” In other words, Paul worked hard at leading himself so that he could effectively lead others.
If that is your goal, there are things you can do to improve your self-leadership.  Here are four. I have tried to practice them as a prerequisite for leading others:
  1. Learn Followership
Bishop Fulton J. Sheen remarked, “Civilization is always in danger when those who have never learned to obey are given the right to command.” Only a leader who has followed well knows how to lead others well. Good leadership requires an understanding of the world that followers live in. Connecting with your congregation and your staff becomes possible because you have walked in their shoes. You know what it means to be under authority and thus have a better sense of how authority should be exercised.
In contrast, leaders who have never followed well or submitted to authority tend to be prideful, unrealistic, rigid and autocratic. They lord their position and power over others.  Jesus warned against this (Matt 20:24).  No, instead we are to “Submit to one another out of reverence for Christ” (Ephesians 5:21). If we desire to make an impact, we must first learn to follow under the authority of others.
  1. Develop Self-Discipline
It’s said that one day, Frederick the Great of Prussia was walking on the outskirts of Berlin when he encountered a very old man walking ramrod-straight in the opposite direction.
“Who are you?” Frederick asked his subject.
“I am a king,” replied the old man.
“A king!” laughed Frederick. “Over what kingdom do you reign?”
“Over myself,” was the proud old man’s reply.
Each of us is “monarch” over our own lives. We are responsible for ruling our actions and decisions. To make consistently good decisions, to take the right action at the right time and to refrain from the wrong actions requires character and self-discipline. To do otherwise is to lose control of ourselves—to do or say things we regret, to miss opportunities we are given, to spend ourselves into debt. As Solomon remarked, “The rich rule over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender” (Prov 22:7).
When we are foolish, we want to conquer the world. When we are wise, we want to conquer ourselves. This begins when we do what we should, no matter how we feel about it.
  1. Practice Patience
Leaders are often impatient people.  The leaders I know look ahead, think ahead and want to move ahead. This can be good; being one step ahead makes you a leader. However, impatience can also lead to trouble.  Some of my greatest leadership gaffes have come because I tried to take a shortcut instead of respecting the leadership process.
Few worthwhile things in life come quickly. There is no such thing as instant greatness or instant maturity—not for you, and not for your staff or the members of your congregation. We are used to instant oatmeal, instant coffee and microwave popcorn. But becoming a leader doesn’t happen overnight. Microwave leaders don’t have any staying power. Leadership is more of a Crock-Pot proposition. It takes time, but the end product is worth the wait.
Leaders need to remember that the point of leading is not to cross the finish line first; it’s to take people across the finish line with you. Isn’t this why God called us to ministry—for the sake of others?  God is in the people business, and so are we.
If you are moving too fast, you must deliberately slow your pace.  Stay connected to your people, enlist them to help fulfill the vision, and motivate them to persevere. You can’t do this if you’re running too far ahead of your people.
Take Action
In which of the three preceding areas—followership, self-discipline, or patience—do you most need to grow? What new task or practice could you take on to develop in that area? Give yourself a concrete goal and a deadline. 
  1. Seek Accountability
Few things are more disheartening or harmful than seeing Christian leaders fail in their trust because of an ethical failure. People who lead themselves well know a secret: they cannot trust themselves. Good leaders know that power can be seductive, and they understand their own fallibility. To deny it is to put yourself in danger.
Over the years, I’ve read about many leaders who failed ethically in their leadership. Can you guess what they had in common? They all thought it could never happen to them. They had a false sense of security.
This was a sobering realization for me, and it led me to make two commitments that I hope you will make for your own sake, for the sake of your family, and for the sake of your church: First, I will not trust myself. Second, I will become accountable to others.
Accountability isn’t just the willingness to explain your actions to others. It begins long before we act. It starts with seeking and accepting advice from others. Most wrong actions come about because people are not held accountable early enough.
Take Action
How well do you take advice? Ask five to ten friends, colleagues and family members to evaluate you according to this scale:
  1. You don’t want advice.
  2. You don’t object to advice.
  3. You welcome advice.
  4. You actively seek advice.
  5. You often follow the advice given to you.
Average your scores. If you average is below a 4, you need to improve in this area. Begin enlisting others in your information-gathering process before you make decisions. If you are married, begin with your spouse.

A Higher Standard

Leading yourself well means that you hold yourself to a higher standard of accountability than others do. Why? Because God holds you responsible not only for your own actions, but also for those of the people you lead. Leadership is a trust, not a right. For that reason, you must “fix” yourself earlier than others may be required to.
Thomas J. Watson, the former chairman of IBM, said, “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.” Leaders receive very little fanfare for quietly leading themselves well day in and day out. Most people are unaware of the disciplines their leaders practice or the sacrifices they make outside of the spotlight.  However, they don’t do it for recognition;  they do it for results.  What leaders do day-to-day always pays off in the long run.  Success or failure isn’t an event, but a process.
The bottom line is that the smallest crowd you will ever lead is you—but it’s the most important one.  If you do that well, then you will earn the right to lead even bigger crowds.  And on the days that you find it difficult to lead yourself well and you’re tempted to give up, remember the Parable of the Minas.  To the servants who managed their affairs well, their master gave them greater leadership responsibilities; He put them in charge of cities (Luke 19:17).  What’s more, he told them, “Well done.”
Lead yourself well, and God will reward your faithfulness.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Don’t Send Your Ducks to Eagle School-By: Jim Rohn


Don’t Send Your Ducks to Eagle School-By: Jim Rohn

The first rule of management is this: Don’t send your ducks to eagle school. Why? Because it won’t work. Good people are found, not changed. They can change themselves, but you can’t change them. If you want good people, you have to find them. If you want motivated people, you have to find them, not motivate them.
I picked up a magazine not long ago in New York that had a full-page ad in it for a hotel chain. The first line of the ad read, “We do not teach our people to be nice.” Now that got my attention. The second line said, “We hire nice people.” I thought, What a clever shortcut!”
Motivation is a mystery. Why are some people motivated and some are not? Why does one salesperson see his first prospect at seven in the morning while the other sees his first prospects at 11 in the morning? Why would one start at seven and the other start at 11? I don’t know. Call it “mysteries of the mind.”
I give lectures to a thousand people at a time. One walks out and says, “I’m going to change my life.” Another walks out with a yawn and says, “I’ve heard all this stuff before.” Why is that?
The wealthy man says to a thousand people, “I read this book, and it started me on the road to wealth.” Guess how many of the thousand go out and get the book? Answer: very few. Isn’t that incredible? Why wouldn’t everyone go get the book? Mysteries of the mind.
To one person, you have to say, “You’d better slow down. You can’t work that many hours, do that many things, go, go, go. You’re going to have a heart attack and die.” And to another person, you have to say, “When are you going to get off the couch?” What is the difference? Why wouldn’t everyone strive to be wealthy and happy?
Chalk it up to mysteries of the mind and don’t waste your time trying to turn ducks into eagles. Hire people who already have the motivation and drive to be eagles and then just let them soar.
Article written by: Jim Rohn.

Monday, February 16, 2015

How To Get More Work Done In A Day By Zig Ziglar

How To Get More Work Done In A Day By Zig Ziglar

How To Get More Work Done In A Day By Zig Ziglar

How do you achieve employment security in a world where there is no employment security? I start with a question: Do you consider yourself to be honest and at least reasonably intelligent? Okay. As an honest, intelligent person, do you, as a general rule, get about twice as much work done on the day before you go on vacation as you normally get done?
Now I am going to ask you a long question, so stay with me all the way through. If we can figure out why and learn how and repeat it every day without working any longer or any harder, does it make sense that we will be more valuable to ourselves, our company, our family and our community? The answer is “Yes.”
I want to make it crystal clear that I am communicating with you about you-I’m not referring to anybody else, but to you about you. You have undoubtedly already confessed that you are honest and intelligent.
Now on the night before the day before vacation, do you get your laptop or a sheet of paper out and plan, “Now tomorrow I’ve got to do this and this….” We’ve coined a very clever name for that–we call that goal setting. So, you set your goals. Then you get them organized in the order of their importance.
Let me encourage you to make one slight change there. Get the disagreeable and difficult things out of the way first. Free your mind so you can concentrate on what else you have got to do. You get it organized. You accept responsibility. You make the commitments. You know that some people are about as committed as a Kamikaze pilot on his thirty-ninth mission-they just aren’t serious about it.
Now commitment is important whether it is to get your education, make one more call, keep the marriage together or whatever. Commitment is important because when you hit the wall-not IF, but WHEN you hit the wall–if you have made a commitment your first thought is, “How do I solve the problem?” If you haven’t made the commitment your first thought is, “How do I get out of this deal?” And we find literally what we are looking for.
When you make that commitment, things happen. It shows that you really care about the other people on the job. It demonstrates that you are dependable. Even though you’re leaving town, you’re not going to leave an unfinished task for others to do. Your integrity comes through.
Have you ever participated in organized team sports? Did you ever go home one night and say to your parents something like, “Mom, Dad, you won’t believe the game plan the coach has worked out. Man alive, it is incredible. We’re going to kill those suckers tomorrow. You can count on it.” You were optimistic simply because you had a plan of action, and likewise you are optimistic that tomorrow you are going to be able to get all of the things done that need to be done before you can go on that vacation.
Now some of us are born optimistic, and some are born pessimistic. For your information, the 1828 Noah Webster Dictionary does not have the word pessimist in it. It has the word optimist. Now I am a natural born optimist. I really am. I would take my last two dollars and buy a money belt with it. That’s the way I’m put together. But the good news is if you are a natural born pessimist, you definitely, emphatically, positively can change. You are a pessimist by choice because you are what you are and where you are because of what’s gone into your mind. You can change what you are; you can change where you are, by changing what goes into your mind.
Anyway, on the day before you go on vacation you not only get to work on time, you are a little early and you immediately get started. You don’t stand around and say, “Well, I wonder what I ought to do now.” You can’t wait to get after it. You want to do the right thing so you get started in a big hurry. You are enthusiastic about it. You are highly motivated. You decisively move from one task to another.
Now I am going to camp on this one for just a moment. Have you noticed that as a general rule people who have nothing to do want to do it with you? It’s true, isn’t it? Now, on this day before vacation, when you finish one task you move with purpose to another one. And people just will not block you for that two-minute gossip session or four-minute or five-minute or six-minute chat.
I am absolutely convinced and have no doubt about it that the listener has more to do with gossiping than the speaker does, because if you don’t listen nobody is going to gossip to you. They just won’t. When you move with purpose, people will step aside and let you go. I will absolutely guarantee that you will save a minimum of an hour a day in two-, three, five-minute spurts of time.
An hour a day is five hours per week is 250 hours per year. That is six weeks of your life that you’ve wasted and six weeks of combined time that you have wasted with people who have been gossiping with you. What could you do with six extra weeks every year?
Focus on the issue at hand. Discipline yourself to stay with it until you finish. Sybil Stanton gave me the best definition of discipline I have ever read in her book, The Twenty Five Hour Woman. “Discipline isn’t on your back needling you with imperatives. It is at your side encouraging you with incentives.”
Treat every day like it’s the day before vacation and you will get more work done!
Article by: Zig Ziglar.
_________________

Sunday, February 15, 2015

Rohn: 4 Things You Can Learn from Your Child

Rohn: 4 Things You Can Learn from Your Child

Refresh your perspective on life and practice being child-like.

Remember the master teacher once said 2,000 years ago, “Unless you can become like little children, your chances are zero; you haven’t got a prayer.” This is a major consideration for adults.
Be like children, and remember there are four ways to be more like a child no matter how old you get…
1. Curiosity
Be curious; embrace childish curiosity. What will kids do if they want to know something bad enough? You’re right. They will bug you. Kids can ask a million questions. You think they’re through, then they’ve got another million. They will keep plaguing you. They can drive you right to the brink.
Kids use their curiosity to learn. Have you ever noticed that while adults are stepping on ants, children are studying them? A child’s curiosity is what helps them to reach, learn and grow.
2. Excitement
Learn to get excited like a child. There is nothing that has more magic than childish excitement. So excited that you hate to go to bed at night… that you can’t wait to get up in the morning… that you’re about to explode. How can anyone resist that kind of childish magic?
Now, once in a while I meet someone who says, “Well, I’m a little too mature for all that childish excitement.” Isn’t that pitiful? You’ve got to weep for these kinds of people. All I’ve got to say is, “If you’re too old to get excited, you’re old.” Don’t get that old.
3. Faith
Faith is childish. How else would you describe it? Some people say, “Let’s be adult about it.” Oh, no. No. Adults too often have a tendency to be overly skeptical. Some adults even have a tendency to be cynical.
Adults say, “Yeah. I’ve heard that old positive line before. It will be a long day in June before I fall for that positive line. You’ve got to prove to me it’s any good.” See, that’s adult, but kids aren’t that way.
Kids think you can get anything. They are really funny. You tell them, “We’re going to have three swimming pools.” And they say, “Yeah. Three. One each. Stay out of my swimming pool.” See, they start dividing them up right away, but adults are not like that. Adults say, “Three swimming pools? You’re out of your mind. Most people don’t even have one swimming pool. You’ll be lucky to get a tub in the backyard.”
You notice the difference? No wonder the master teacher said, “Unless you can become like little children, your chances, they’re skinny.”
4. Trust
Trust is a childish virtue, but it has great merit. Have you heard the expression “Sleep like a baby”? That’s it. Childish trust. After you’ve gotten an A+ for the day, leave it in somebody else’s hands.
Curiosity, excitement, faith and trust. That is a powerful combination to bring (back) into our lives.
Article by: Jim Rohn.
– See more at: http://www.success.com/article/rohn-4-things-you-can-learn-from-your-child#sthash.tztcVhUU.dpuf

Friday, February 13, 2015

An Explanation of Infinite Intelligence by Napoleon Hill

An Explanation of Infinite Intelligence by Napoleon Hill

At this point we would like to explain just what is meant by the term Infinite Intelligence, because it is our opinion that no one may ever reach the state of mind called faith without a positive, definite belief in a Supreme Being.
In arriving at such a belief and conviction, you may employ every faculty you possess. Observation, experimentation, feeling, prayer, meditation and thought are all legitimate approaches. As in all other activities you use your natural gifts, the sense of body and spirit, and the power of mind, to organize information and knowledge, so in this case, all methods by which facts are discovered may be used in establishing your contact with this Supreme Power.
A man’s religion should be worn in his heart –
not on the lapel of his coat.
Man learns things primarily by seeing their effects or by accepting the statements of others whom he trusts. In the search for this basic reality, the Infinite Power behind all creation, you may look for evidence in the external universe, that which lies beyond the borders of your own body; you may look to your own inner self, by exploring as best you can the workings of your own mind; and you may examine the accumulated history of the race. The external universe, to thinking men, has always been an evidence of the existence of a Supreme, Creative, Directing Power. The heavens today still remain the sublime object of our investigation and speculation; they are indeed witnesses of some great power at work. The advance of science reveals many secrets of the working of this power which we call nature. Every process of nature is orderly. No chance, disorder, or chaos has been seen in the physical universe. The sun does not rise in the East today and in the West tomorrow. All of the phenomena of nature are products of law; not a single exception has thus far been found. The universe exists under a reign of perfect law. Prevalent order, such obedience to law, clearly implied intelligent planning and definiteness of purpose. Order is the product of intelligent direction. Men of science today declare that the universe appears as a product of thought! That conclusion is inescapable. There can be not thought without a thinker. The universe declares that there is intelligent purpose in nature and that, therefore, there must be a supreme Infinite Intelligence directing it.
Source:  PMA Science of Success. Educational Edition. The Napoleon Hill Foundation. 1983, Pgs. 83-84.

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

How to Turn a Loss into a Win

How to Turn a Loss into a Win

From John C. Maxwell.
What an exciting project I got to do last year! For the first time ever, I got to adapt and rewrite one of my books for a new audience: Teens.
The book is Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for Teens, and it comes out this month – on February 24. Created just for teen readers, this book is designed to inspire and challenge them to see setbacks as opportunities – to grow, learn, and improve. Featuring new stories about teens and adults who overcame adversity and mistakes, like teenage Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousufzai and Iron Man actor Robert Downey, Jr, it also provides application exercises and journaling opportunities.
Here’s just a sample of the content of Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for Teens. I believe it can be a good resource for the teens and even preteens in your life.
Have you ever felt like you weren’t allowed to fail? Like your parents and teachers expected you to meet extremely high standards no matter what—even if it didn’t seem possible?
Or have you ever lost at something that you wanted to win? Felt stupid when you were wrong? Wished you could have a major “do-over”?
And what happens when you do mess up? Do you feel hopeless, like you can never recover from the mistake?
If your answer to any of these questions is yes, then this book is for you. If you’re ever going to lose—and you are, because everyone does—then why not put a positive spin on it? How do you do that? By learning from it. A loss isn’t totally a loss if you learn something from it.
Of course, that’s not always easy to do. In a favorite Peanuts comic strip, Charlie Brown walks away from Lucy after a base- ball game, head down, totally dejected.
“Another ball game lost! Good grief!” Charlie moans. “I get tired of losing. Everything I do, I lose!”
“Look at it this way, Charlie Brown,” Lucy replies. “We learn more from losing than we do from winning.”
“That makes me the smartest person in the world!” replies Charlie.
Lucy’s advice makes a lot of sense, but not everyone learns from his losses. A loss doesn’t turn into a lesson unless we work hard to make it so. Losing gives us a chance to learn something, but many people do not seize that opportunity. And when they don’t, that’s when losing hurts.
It’s hard to learn when we’re feeling down, because then we have to do things that aren’t natural. It’s hard to smile when we are not happy. It is difficult to respond with a good attitude when we’re numb with defeat. How will we face others when we are humiliated? How do we get back up when we are continually knocked down?
If you really want to become a learner, you need to change the way you look at your losses or mistakes and develop some important qualities that will help you respond to them. I hope this book will be of value to you, teaching you how to learn from your losses. Most of us need someone to help us figure out how to do that.
I believe that by developing the qualities below and practicing them in your own life, you can learn to move forward from mistakes and use what you learn to grow and succeed:
Humility: The Spirit of Learning
Reality: The Foundation of Learning
Responsibility: The First Step of Learning
Improvement: The Focus of Learning
Hope: The Motivation of Learning
Teachability: The Pathway of Learning
Adversity: The Catalyst for Learning
Problems: Opportunities for Learning
Bad Experiences: The Perspective for Learning
Change: The Price of Learning
Maturity: The Value of Learning
Saint Ignatius Loyola, one of the world’s greatest educators, once said that we learn only when we are ready to learn. Emmet Fox, noted twentieth-century spiritual leader, said that difficulties come to you at the right time to help you grow and move forward by overcoming them. “The only real misfortune,” he observed, “the only real tragedy, comes when we suffer without learning the lesson.”
If you’re like most people, you’ve suffered some loss in your life. Are you ready to learn from it? I hope you’ll join me in looking at how you can turn losses into opportunities, and how you can see failures from a different perspective. The ideas in this book can help you now and will continue to do so as you grow into young adulthood. Everybody messes up. You only need to learn how to move on from it.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

ViSalus’ Flagship Program

ViSalus’ Flagship Program

ViSalus accomplishes the Vi mission and brings to life through The Challenge platform, which provides innovative products, programs, tools and support to help people achieve their weight loss and fitness goals — from losing the first 10 lbs.
(PROJECT 10 Challenge), to achieving a 90-day goal (Body by Vi 90-DayChallenge), to leading a healthy, sustainable lifestyle (Vi Life Challenge).
Are you ready to transform lives?
Take a moment to explore the many ways and opportunities ViSalus can help you earn spare-time, part-time, or full-time income as a Challenge Promoter…and transform people’s lives by improving their life, health and prosperity worldwide. I CHALLENGE YOU to Be Playful. Be Powerful. Be Bold.  Live YOUR Life and join me, GJ Reynolds on The CHALLENGE!
Playful & Powerful Warrior Entrepreneur:
GJ Reynolds, simply known as “G”, is a passionate playful & powerful warrior entrepreneur, business developer, trainer, public speaker, life transformer and author. G is driven to assist others to reach their full potential and to reclaim their personal power and transform their life, health, and prosperity. He loves to teach the individuals and entrepreneurs he works with, to live in their magnificence and be the playful and powerful warriors they are.
Since 2006, G has been with ViSalus and is a co-founder of the Body by Vi 90 Day Challenge and Project 10 Challenge.  It is the leading platform for weight-loss and fitness results, making it fun and easy to set and achieve a 90 day goal.  With good nutrition as our foundation and a powerful social network as our mobilizer, we’re committed to working together, as a company and a community, to provide a real solutions to the global obesity epidemic.
G is one of the original founding members (equity holders), Ambassadors and Director of Sales.  G and his wife are 5 Star Ambassadors and Vi Millionaires.  They currently have Promoters in the United States of America, Canada, Jamaica, and through out Europe.  G’s global reach continues to grow and his goal of impacting One Billion lives is in process, one person at a time.  In the coming years, the company goal is to be the number one company with transformations, healthy fast food and to own the healthy breakfast markets, globally.  We know the tip of the arrow and are moving fast to achieve the lofty goals set.  Since ViSalus launched The Body by Vi Challenge and Project 10 Challenge in 2009, it has completed the following:
    • Over One and Half Billion Dollars in Sales
    • Over 3.5 million Challenge transformations to date
    • Over $175 million in free products and prizes given away
    • Over 4 million meals donated through the Vi Community Challenge & PROJECT 10 Kids
    • Over 750,000 Free Challenge Kits already given away
    • North America’s #1 Weight-Loss Shake Mix*  (*2012)
Vi is well on its way to being the number one global company in personal Transformations, the Healthy Fast Food of choice, the Breakfast market and number one in Challenges.   The Challenge is simple. It’s fun. And it WORKS, it WORKS, it WORKS!  G challenges YOU to transform your Life, Health and Prosperity.  Accept the Challenge!

Sunday, February 8, 2015

ViDentity - Our Vi6 Values

ViDentity - Our Vi6 Values

1. Be Inspired. Be Inspiring.
2. Build Trust Through Collaboration.
3. Be a Good Teacher and a Better Student.
4. Think Like an Entrepreneur; be Resourceful.
5. Seek Simplicity.
6. Challenge Yourself. Challenge Others
I CHALLENGE YOU to Be Playful. Be Powerful. Be Bold.  Live YOUR Life and join me, GJ Reynolds on The CHALLENGE!
G became an entrepreneur in 1991 and since then has owned or operated several successful telecommunications, direct sales, marketing, and development companies.  In 2002 he also started a NASCAR sanctioned truck team, with his partners. He has led the entire operations for several of these companies, which have assisted other entrepreneurs in telecommunications, sales and marketing, market research, business plan development, and funding. These companies have yielded billions of dollars in revenues. G has also assembled, trained, lead, coached, and mentored sales and marketing teams of two to over 100,000.
G co-founded BeachLifestyle, a community on how to live the BeachLifestyle.  In 2012 BeachLifestyle transitioned to the Simply G Media Network.   The network has a variety of programming and has an international reach both via the Internet and syndicated terrestrial radio stations.  The network continues to grow and has monthly listening audience in excess of several million listeners.
Since 2006, G has been with ViSalus and is a co-founder of the Body by Vi 90 Day Challenge and Project 10 Challenge.  It is the leading platform for weight-loss and fitness results, making it fun and easy to set and achieve a 90 day goal.  With good nutrition as our foundation and a powerful social network as our mobilizer, we’re committed to working together, as a company and a community, to provide a real solutions to the global obesity epidemic.
G is one of the original founding members (equity holders), Ambassadors and Director of Sales.  G and his wife are 5 Star Ambassadors and Vi Millionaires.  They currently have Promoters in the United States of America, Canada, Jamaica, and through out Europe.  G’s global reach continues to grow and his goal of impacting One Billion lives is in process, one person at a time.  In the coming years, the company goal is to be the number one company with transformations, healthy fast food and to own the healthy breakfast markets, globally.  We know the tip of the arrow and are moving fast to achieve the lofty goals set.  Since ViSalus launched The Body by Vi Challenge and Project 10 Challenge in 2009, it has completed the following:
    • Over One and Half Billion Dollars in Sales
    • Over 3.5 million Challenge transformations to date
    • Over $175 million in free products and prizes given away
    • Over 4 million meals donated through the Vi Community Challenge & PROJECT 10 Kids
    • Over 750,000 Free Challenge Kits already given away
    • North America’s #1 Weight-Loss Shake Mix*  (*2012)
Vi is well on its way to being the number one global company in personal Transformations, the Healthy Fast Food of choice, the Breakfast market and number one in Challenges.   The Challenge is simple. It’s fun. And it WORKS, it WORKS, it WORKS!  G challenges YOU to transform your Life, Health and Prosperity.  Accept the Challenge!

Friday, February 6, 2015

Two Types of Master Mind by Napoleon Hill


There are two general types of master mind alliances. One type is for purely social or personal reasons, consisting of one’s relatives, friends and religious advisors, where no material gain is sought. The other type is the occupational, business or professional alliance consisting of individuals who have a motive of a material or financial nature – in other words, an economic alliance designed to help you sell your personal services, your skill, your ability, or to help you succeed in business.
Educational Activity. No man is ever through learning. If your major purpose in life is aimed above the average, you must continue to learn from every possible source, and especially where you can acquire knowledge particularly related to your purpose. Books in the public library make available to you the entire accumulated experience of mankind all highly organized and presented to you in concise forms. All they require of you in return is your effort in reading and studying them. Another source of knowledge and information too often overlooked is found in your daily life. By carefully choosing your friends and associates you can acquire a liberal education in a variety of subjects by the very enjoyable medium of conversation. This is a rich source of help, and one that you can tap by carefully selecting a social master mind group who will find the exchange mutually beneficial.
Religious Activity. We advocate no specific religion, but recognize the value of the contacts one may make in associating with church groups. These spiritual experiences enrich life, and the church or synagogue brings people together under favorable and harmonious circumstances. Often an alliance with members of your religious faith can be of immeasurable service to you in the furtherance of your definite major purpose.
Political Activity. Since the preservation of our privilege of becoming self-determining depends largely on keeping our government as it was intended to be, every citizen has a solemn responsibility to become informed on the political issues of the day and to vote intelligently. Political affiliation is also a source of contact which is often quite valuable.
Social Activity. This is a way to become acquainted with people with whom you can enjoy an exchange of helpful ideas. Here is where your wife or husband can be of tremendous assistance to you. A mind – to remain brilliant, alert, receptive and flexible – must constantly have the companionship of other minds. The medium of the master mind fulfills this requirement as nothing else can.
An Economic Alliance. No man can achieve greatness alone. Every outstanding success is based on cooperative effort. For instance, take the modern transportation and communication systems which cover our nation. They offer services which have never been achieved elsewhere. Using the principle of the master mind, they have combined all the resources necessary to implement and maintain elaborate organizations, coordinating the efforts of thousands of men and women for a single purpose.
Source:  PMA Science of Success. Educational Edition. The Napoleon Hill Foundation. 1983. Pgs. 73-74.

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Why You Should Do More Than Expected-By: John C. Maxwell

Why You Should Do More Than Expected-By: John C. Maxwell

Have you ever seen the “You had one job!” joke? It’s usually a picture like the one of the sign above, with a crazy error like “Please slow drively.” Or like spelling “STOP” S-O-T-P, or hanging a stair railing upside-down. Google it and you’ll see thousands of examples, because apparently there are a lot of people who can’t seem to do the one thing asked of them.
And that’s the first thing I’d encourage you to do if you want to to be successful in your career. Do what’s asked of you. Meet expectations. Hit the target. That alone will make you stand out.
But I believe there’s a higher goal than just doing your “one job.” Instead of just meeting expectations, you can make it your goal to exceed them. That’s where the joy is. And it’s where lasting impact can be found.
I’ve spent the past 40+ years trying to exceed expectations. My model for it was my dad. He has gifts, but he’s not an overly gifted person. But for my whole life, I’ve watched him go above and beyond what others expect of him, or what they even think is possible. He’s received recognition for his hard work and consistency, sure. But more importantly, he’s received fulfillment and joy because of his efforts. I decided a long time ago that I wanted that, too. So I work hard to be an “and then some” person.
I never really go into a project thinking about how I can meet people’s expectations. I always ask, “How can I meet their expectations and surprise them in a positive way?” Where’s the surprise when I speak to a group? Where’s the surprise when I meet with a young leader? Where’s the surprise in a book that I write?
Why do I do this? Because I love it! I get great delight from positively surprising people. Plus, they’re much more likely to invite me back to speak, or to read my next book.
Here are three “don’ts” and one “do” if you want to consistently exceed expectations:
Don’t rely on your reputation.
I think that when we’re successful, our greatest temptation is to enjoy living on the past. We’ve gained a reputation for doing great things, and it’s really easy to “rest on our laurels,” so to speak. We forget how we got our reputation and start putting our energy into guarding it, instead of growing it anew. But we got our reputation by producing, and that’s how we need to build on it. Don’t just protect your reputation for good work. Do better work.

Don’t rely on your relationships.

I’ve noticed that this is a real problem for a lot of people. For whatever reason, when they don’t meet or exceed expectations, their response is to play the “relationship card.” They say, “I know I didn’t do what I needed to do, but after all, we’re friends.”
Relationships are definitely important in life and can carry us through a lot of hard times. But this kind of thing is an abuse of a relationship, and it will suffer as a result. When you rely on a relationship instead of your efforts, you not only don’t exceed expectations, you don’t meet them either.

Don’t expect unearned respect.

We should never try to demand respect. I believe that respect must be earned daily. And the only way to do that is to continually produce and do more than is expected. I believe that once we understand that respect is not a given, we work harder and start each day with a clean slate. We don’t get to demand respect today because of what we achieved yesterday. Every day needs a fresh commitment to exceeding expectations.

Do ask questions, give your best, and ask questions again.

When I have a speaking engagement coming up, I ask a number of important questions. I want to know who will be there. What does the leader want his or her people to get out of it? How is morale? The answers to these questions help me to tailor my message so that it has the highest impact. It helps me discover what the expectations are, so I know how high to aim to exceed them.
When you receive an assignment, first make sure you understand what all the expectations are. You do this by asking questions on the front end until you know your goals. Then give your best, aiming higher than expected, and creating a positive surprise.
Finally, after the assignment is completed, ask how you did. I do that with my speaking. I ask the person who brought me in to speak whether my talk was what they desired. And of course, I’m hoping they say that it was more than expected.
By asking after the task is done, you’ll get good feedback and discover whether you succeeded in exceeding expectations. This helps you grow and learn how to better serve the leader in the future.
Anyone can exceed expectations once in awhile. The trick is to do it consistently. When you avoid relying on reputation, relationships, or respect, and instead ask the right questions, you can establish the habit of exceeding expectations. This will provide joy and fulfillment. Plus, it will probably give you recognition, which only opens the door to more opportunities to impact your world.
Article By: John C. Maxwell.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Life, Health & Prosperity-Vi’s Three Founding Pillars


LIFE.
A Community – Building quality relationships and
meaningful experiences
HEALTH.
A Platform – Combining innovative products, programs,
and support for lasting physical and personal transformation
PROSPERITY.
A Path – Delivering freedom and financial independence
through the value we bring to others, while doing our part to give back.I CHALLENGE YOU to Be Playful. Be Powerful. Be Bold.  Live YOUR Life and join me, GJ Reynolds on The CHALLENGE!
Article by: GJ Reynolds.
Playful & Powerful Warrior Entrepreneur:
GJ Reynolds, simply known as “G”, is a passionate playful & powerful warrior entrepreneur, business developer, trainer, public speaker, life transformer and author. G is driven to assist others to reach their full potential and to reclaim their personal power and transform their life, health, and prosperity. He loves to teach the individuals and entrepreneurs he works with, to live in their magnificence and be the playful and powerful warriors they are.
Since 2006, G has been with ViSalus and is a co-founder of the Body by Vi 90 Day Challenge and Project 10 Challenge.  It is the leading platform for weight-loss and fitness results, making it fun and easy to set and achieve a 90 day goal.  With good nutrition as our foundation and a powerful social network as our mobilizer, we’re committed to working together, as a company and a community, to provide a real solutions to the global obesity epidemic.
G is one of the original founding members (equity holders), Ambassadors and Director of Sales.  G and his wife are 5 Star Ambassadors and Vi Millionaires.  They currently have Promoters in the United States of America, Canada, Jamaica, and through out Europe.  G’s global reach continues to grow and his goal of impacting One Billion lives is in process, one person at a time.  In the coming years, the company goal is to be the number one company with transformations, healthy fast food and to own the healthy breakfast markets, globally.  We know the tip of the arrow and are moving fast to achieve the lofty goals set.  Since ViSalus launched The Body by Vi Challenge and Project 10 Challenge in 2009, it has completed the following:
    • Over One and Half Billion Dollars in Sales
    • Over 3.5 million Challenge transformations to date
    • Over $175 million in free products and prizes given away
    • Over 4 million meals donated through the Vi Community Challenge & PROJECT 10 Kids
    • Over 750,000 Free Challenge Kits already given away
    • North America’s #1 Weight-Loss Shake Mix*  (*2012)
Vi is well on its way to being the number one global company in personal Transformations, the Healthy Fast Food of choice, the Breakfast market and number one in Challenges.   The Challenge is simple. It’s fun. And it WORKS, it WORKS, it WORKS!  G challenges YOU to transform your Life, Health and Prosperity.  Accept the Challenge!

Monday, February 2, 2015

Zig Ziglar: Defining Success

Zig Ziglar: Defining Success

Few have had as great an impact on as many people as Zig Ziglar. As a sales trainer, motivational speaker and best-selling author, Ziglar has helped millions of individuals improve not only their perspective on life, but, more important, their results.
After a bumpy start, Ziglar built a wildly successful career in sales. But the more he learned about selling and personal achievement, the more interested he became in motivational speaking. He wanted to help others attain the success he enjoyed. In 1970, while in his early 40s, Ziglar made a career shift and began to speak full time. Since then, he has engaged thousands of audiences and sold millions of books and audio programs, including the best-selling See You at the Top: 25th Anniversary Edition, which sold more than 1.5 million copies, and the audio program How to Stay Motivated. Exactly how many lives has the 83-year-old Ziglar touched? “We began counting the number of people Zig has impacted and had to stop at 25.5 million people,” says a spokesperson with the Zig Ziglar Corporation.
With his unique cadence and strong Southern drawl, Ziglar admonishes people to be specific about what they want to achieve, to be purposeful in their approach to personal development, and to help as many others as possible along the way. And though he is a dyed-in-the-wool believer in the power of positive thinking, there is nothing secret about his philosophy on achieving success. “Positive thinking won’t let you do anything,” Ziglar says. “But it will help you do everything better than negative thinking will.” His constant message is that success requires full engagement and hard work. When combined with an unshakable positive attitude and character, success is inevitable. Here are a few more of Ziglar’s tried-and-true strategies.
– See more at: http://www.success.com/article/zig-ziglar-defining-success#sthash.t7wepSyp.dpuf